'Clean' sleeping

‘Clean’ sleeping

clean sleeping

What is clean sleeping? And should you be doing it?

Sleep is always a hot topic, with the importance of a good night’s sleep being promoted as a vital part of self-care. Relaxation activities like yoga and meditation made a major comeback to the field of wellness, this time with the
aim of helping people unwind and shut off to ensure a decent snooze. However, many people are still not getting the
rest they need to properly recharge.

READ MORE: HOW TO: GET ENOUGH GOOD SLEEP

Now, the focus of sleep will be on ‘clean’ sleeping – making it an absolute priority to employ good sleep practices
and routines, with a focus on quality over quantity.

Sleep is a vital part of your overall health. In fact, sleep deprivation is considered a leading cause of obesity,
interruptions in brain function, and heart disease. Just as restful sleep will give you more energy to exercise and help you feel less stressed, in turn exercise, a clean diet and lower stress levels help you enjoy better sleep. It’s a beneficial cycle that contributes to your overall wellbeing.

To ensure your sleep is as ‘clean’ as possible:

READ MORE: 3 REASONS WHY YOU’RE NOT GETTING ENOUGH SLEEP (AND HOW TO FIX THEM)

Turn off screens and other devices before you go to bed. This will remove that almost obsessive ‘must check notifications’ feeling you experience, eliminate light sources, and stop any electronic buzzing in the room.

Avoid caffeine and sugar as much as possible during the day, and completely abstain during the evening. Anything that spikes your energy levels before bed is bound to disrupt your sleep.

Keep your bedroom dark. Turn off anything that emits light and, if possible, invest in blackout blinds or
heavy duty curtains to keep out light pollution. Darkness encourages the production of melatonin, the sleep
hormone, as our natural sleep-wake cycles are attuned to day and night. Artificial light can trick your brain into producing less melatonin, preventing a deep, good quality sleep.

Cool down your room. The optimal temperature for your bedroom should be between 16 and 20 degrees as temperatures higher or lower than this can interfere with quality sleep. Your body naturally begins to cool as you fall asleep, which increases the feeling of tiredness, so helping your body reach the right temperature faster can improve sleep.

Make your bed a comfy haven. A comfortable mattress, supportive pillows and a cosy duvet will help you remain in a deep sleep state, keeping tossing and turning to a minimum.

READ MORE: TURN YOUR BEDROOM INTO A SLEEP SANCTUARY 

Keep out noise. Noisy neighbours, cars whooshing by and general outside noise can hold your brain’s attention, preventing you from falling into a deep asleep. Listening to a white noise machine while you fall asleep might help to
drown out distracting sounds.

COMPILED BY CAITLIN GENG PHOTOS: FOTOLIA.COM

The advice contained here is strictly for information purposes. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, and treatment. Always consult your GP or a doctor for specific information regarding your health.

Joni van der Merwe

About Joni van der Merwe

Digital editor I’m getting married in 2018 and I think it’s the perfect time to focus on my relationship with not only my fiance but my friends, family and colleagues too. I want to nurture and cherish the people I love by being more understanding and present in their lives.

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